Tottenham Hale masterplan row:N17 locals fear 21-storey apartment blocks 'will cast a huge shadow across the whole of Hale Village'

Local residents complain they will lose their views if plans for the regeneration of the the River Lee Navigation waterfront, including apartment blocks up to 21 storeys tall, go ahead. 

Tottenham Hale, one of London’s emerging regeneration zones, will soon have 500 new homes, along with floating offices, as old workshops and warehouses are cleared away. However, the project, long delayed by recession, has caused uproar among local residents who claim they will lose their views if the new buildings are given the go-ahead.

This first look at the designs submitted to Haringey council for planning consent by Allies and Morrison — the architecture practice that helped plan the 2012 Olympics — shows how an unloved 5.6-acre site could become home to 1,000 Londoners living in apartment blocks up to 21 storeys tall, with shops and offices — even  floating offices, or “business barges” — along the River Lee Navigation waterfront.

If permission for the multimillion-pound project is granted, the homes will be built on a thin strip of riverside and linked to the “mainland” by two new pedestrian and cycle bridges. Their pitched roofs and brick façades evoke traditional quayside buildings, and residents on the upper floors will enjoy long-ranging views across north-east London.

However, in an official complaint to the council, local resident Howard Kufluk says: “These buildings will cast a huge shadow across the whole of Hale Village,”  while Jack Arnold says he bought his flat in the area partly because of its “wonderful view across the river and the marshes...To have this obstructed would be awful.”

George Vogiatzis says: “Local amenities such as roads, shops, and especially our schools are already at their maximum capacity.

The 5.6-acre site could become home to 1,000 Londoners living in apartment blocks up to 21 storeys tall

“As a daily user of Tottenham Hale station I cannot imagine how the station will be able to cope. Tottenham Hale station and the Victoria line are already overcrowded.”

However, Tottenham Hale Underground station is to be enlarged by Transport for London, and the station is also pencilled in as a new stop on the proposed Crossrail 2 train line from north to south London.

Ben Hewins, who also lives in Tottenham Hale, backs the homes and offices plan, saying: “Rents are outrageously high in Haringey. Any new provision of good-quality housing will help keep them under control and must be supported.”

A series of major regeneration projects are planned in Tottenham Hale. Argent, the firm responsible for the redevelopment of King’s Cross, intends to build between 600 and 800 new homes on a retail park site, and create a new town centre-style shopping centre.

The average price of a flat in the N17 postcode currently stands at just under £310,000, according to Rightmove, up from under £270,000 in the last 12 months.

Follow us on Twitter @HomesProperty and Facebook