Commute to London from Surrey or Sussex and watch your home’s value rise

Now is the time to buy along the annual London 2 Brighton Challenge route as a new report reveals strong house price growth in a cluster of towns and villages in Surrey and Sussex.
Later this month hundreds of athletes will take part in the annual London 2 Brighton Challenge. Londoners running through the towns and villages of Surrey and Sussex should take note — these places are showing a healthy price growth as buyers squeezed out of the capital move in.
Thousands of commuters make this journey, boarding trains from Victoria or London Bridge. Beyond Gatwick airport but still within an hour of the capital, there are 10 stops for buyers to choose from, whether they are looking for a value-for-money starter home or a country pile.

Research by Savills details a cluster of Surrey addresses — Redhill, Earlswood and Salfords — that have enjoyed solid annual price growth, with the average house price now standing at £312,258.


In terms of charm and aesthetic appeal, Redhill is a bit of a poor relation compared to Surrey’s top commuter towns, such as Guildford. However, a £50 million facelift is planned for Redhill station, which will include a town square, shops and new homes. The main factor in Redhill’s favour is the speed of the commute — trains to London take 35 minutes and an annual season ticket costs £2,672.
What Redhill does have is quality primary and senior schools. The Warwick School and Saint Bede’s School are rated “good” by Ofsted.
However, it doesn’t have a great array of period houses, although it offers plenty of affordable new-build properties in the city centre and post-war houses in the suburbs.
Will Norris, a negotiator at Connells Residential, says his buyers tend to be young couples looking for a central two-bedroom flat for between £200,000 and £240,000. They should expect to pay £450,000-plus for a four-bedroom house. Buyers who want period homes should look to nearby Earlswood, where roomy detached Victorian and Edwardian houses sell for about £400,000.
A new report reveals strong house price growth in a cluster of towns and villages beyond Gatwick airport, but still within an hour of the capital in Surrey and Sussex.

Strong choices in West Sussex are Haywards Heath and neighbouring Lindfield, just south of the Sussex Weald, within easy reach of some of the South East’s loveliest countryside.
Haywards Heath is a 44-minute journey to London. An annual season ticket costs £3,808. An average property costs £315,483, up only 3.1 per cent in the past year, but 15.6 per cent since 2007.
Sophie Wysock-Wright, a director of Savills, estimates that four in 10 of her London buyers want a family home.
The top area in the town itself is Lucastes Avenue and the surrounding roads, just west of the station, where a detached four-bedroom Twenties house would cost between £650,000 and £750,000. Close to the station there are three-bedroom Victorian cottages, priced at about £350,000.
Lindfield, which is within a 15-minute walk of Haywards Heath station, has credentials — historic houses, an ancient church and a pond. Buyers can expect to pay between £450,000 and £550,000 for a three-bedroom Victorian semi-detached house.

Moving closer to the South Downs, another good West Sussex commuter choice is Burgess Hill. The journey to London takes 52 minutes and an annual season ticket costs £3,808.
Peter Bushell, branch manager of  Fox & Sons, admits the shops and restaurants aren’t as good as those in Haywards Heath, but adds that buyers who spend another 10 minutes on the train get an extra bedroom or a detached house. It is a “perfect hub” — a good commute to London and only a 20 minute-drive to Brighton.
The best houses are the Victorian, Edwardian and Thirties semi-detached homes along Crescent Road, Park Road and Silverdale Road, priced at about £400,000.
Much of the town’s housing stock was built post-war, and a three-bedroom house built in the Sixties would be priced at about £300,000.

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